04 April 2020,   02:50
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MIA - In the 9 months of 2019, 114 sex offenders against juveniles are exposed

„In the nine months of 2019, 114 sex offenders against juveniles are exposed“, – said Nino Tsatsiashvili, Director of Human Rights Protection and Investigation Quality Monitoring Department at the Ministry of Internal Affairs.

According to her, fighting against sexual offences is the priority for MIA, for this reason they developed a package of legislative changes which aims to stringent lawful punishment and deprivation of certain rights. For instance, after leaving the penitentiary institution, the perpetrators will not be allowed to work in educational institutions.
In order to control sex offenders and protect the juveniles, a database of perpetrators will be created. The individuals will be under permanent surveillance to prevent sexual crimes against minors, the ministry stated.
Nino Tsatsiashvili added that the awareness of society of cases of sexual crimes against minors has increased significantly compared to the previous years. Minors and their parents often appeal to various institutions for help.
 The individuals who mostly appeal to the institutions are:
 Family member/parent – 53%
 Affected child – 8%
 Social Service Agency – 6%
 Resource officer – 6%
 School – 4%
Neighbor – 3%
Child care institutions – 1%
NGOs – 1%
Others – 18%
During the first 9 months of 2019, 152 people were convicted of a sexual offences.  In the same period of 2018, 127 individuals were prosecuted, 101 among them were charged with sexual offenses against minors. The other 26 individuals were charged for indecency with minors.
The Interior Ministry has already drafted a bill which provides civil restrictions and tougher punishment for those convicted of sexual crimes against minors. The bill has been approved in its first reading in parliament, with two additional readings still ahead. The bill reads that the convicts of sexual crimes against minors will be deprived of the right to work at educational institutions.

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