23 May 2024,   22:09
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Before the presidential elections, the government is trying to silence Rustavi 2 - NGOs

Non-governmental organizations respond to the appeal of the government on Rustavi 2, where the government asks the Strasbourg Court to transfer the broadcasting company to Kibar Khalvashi. According to the civil sector, as the presidential elections are approaching, the Georgian authorities are trying to silence Rustavi 2 and change the editorial policy of the channel.

According to the NGOs, it is important that the broadcasting company is independent and there is a critical opinion in the country.

"The closer we get to the elections, the more sensitive the ruling party is towards critical information and it is obvious that the risks are bigger. They should take into account that if anyone interferes with the independent and critical media outlet, it will not remain without response and our international partners will have strict response as well. It is important that temporary measures will not be suspended because we still have questions about Rustavi 2"s trial. The TV company was deprived of a fair trial, "Eka Gigauri, executive director of Transparency International Georgia said.

The NGOs claim that the government has once again confirmed that it has political interest towards the channel demanding suspension of the temporary measure.

"Ms. Tsulukiani had been making statements during the trial period which created the perception feel that the government had the political interest in "Rustavi 2 "case with . This line has continued, "- said the executive director of the International Society for Fair Elections and Democracy, Mikheil Benidze.

According to civil sector, the owner of "Rustavi 2" will change the editorial policy of the channel, which is inadmissible.

"In the interests of the authorities, it still remains to change the ownership of Rustavi 2, which will directly affect its editorial policy," said Giorgi Mshvenieradze, the chairman of the Georgian Democratic Initiative.

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